Blogs2021-06-05T10:59:18+03:00
706, 2021

Verse 37: Evergreen Gardens

June 7th, 2021|Blog, Philosophy|

The previous verse affirmed that if dunyā were to function in accordance with the tenets of dīn, balance and harmony would prevail in this world. The outcome of this balance, as stipulated in this verse, is a better quality of life for humanity, both individually and collectively.  Despite great technical advances the quest for an enriched quality of life for all humankind is an ongoing pursuit and remains somewhat elusive. How one defines ‘quality of life’ is also contested as people seek to strike what they consider a harmonious balance between the spiritual and temporal. In attaining this balance, the [...]

506, 2021

Verse 36: Flourish like Jupiter

June 5th, 2021|Blog, Philosophy|

In this verse, the author asserts that dunyā will only prosper and flourish if it adheres to the tenets exemplified by dīn. As mentioned previously, dīn: entails the obedience of one, is nothing but muḥabba, consists of a set of beliefs which require expression through words and deeds and is considered as the path that leads us to the hereafter. Thus, obedience, muḥabba and a set of beliefs and praxis, all carried out with the intention of reaching the hereafter are the vital prerequisites for the betterment of this temporal world. Political and social systems that aspire to attain this [...]

306, 2021

Verse 35: Like Twins

June 3rd, 2021|Blog, Philosophy|

  The relationship between faith and society has always been a matter of keen debate. There are those that have valued faith for the ethical and moral authority it yields, while others have singled it out as a source of conflict and bloodshed. Using the definite article, the author asserts that, according to Fatimi philosophy, the spiritual and temporal worlds are like twins. In order to understand this relationship, it is first necessary to comprehend what dīn is, and how it differs from sharia. Imam Ahmed al-Mastur AS writes, ‘Dīn is for a group of people to obey one leader.’ [...]

306, 2021

Verse 34: Winds of Destruction

June 3rd, 2021|Blog, Philosophy|

In this verse, the author stipulates that if laws and statutes fail to align themselves to fiṭra - the natural order, then they will be susceptible and ultimately collapse. The use of the metaphoric winds of destruction razing a structure can be said to allude to the Quranic parable of a tribe named ʿĀd and a City of Pillars called Iram. Allah states, ‘Have you not seen how your Lord dealt with ʿĀd? [and] with Iram, [a city] of lofty pillars, the likes of which had never been created across the lands?’ It is said that the people of ʿĀd, [...]

206, 2021

Verse 33: Allah’s Fiṭrat

June 2nd, 2021|Blog, Philosophy|

In this verse, three propositions are made: the natural world functions in a well-defined and orderly manner, a system is required to govern mankind’s life in this world and the more these laws conform to the natural order, the more facilitative they will be and the easier they will be to uphold. The initial verses of this ‘Philosophical Discourse’ reveal the existence of a clearly defined natural order. In verses 6 and 7, the parallel drawn between the intellect’s capacity to perceive and the eyes’ ability to see, in that both are need of an external source of light, is [...]

106, 2021

Verse 32: Divine Grace

June 1st, 2021|Blog, Philosophy|

In the introduction to the first volume, Amir al-Jamea Shahzada Dr Yusuf bhaisaheb Najmuddin QR expressed his intention to further explore the literary devices used in this ‘Philosophical Discourse’. The parallels drawn between faiḍ – divine grace – and the rays of the sun enable one to understand the abundance of faiḍ, its continued immanence and its centrality in sustaining Creation. The verse uses two descriptions of faiḍ. First, the word jār which is usually associated with a flow, like that of a river, indicates its origin from a divine source and its continuance. Second, sār and yasri, which are [...]

All views, thoughts and opinions expressed in these blogs are those of their respective authors and are not attributable to the institution in any manner.
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